• A legacy on the court

    A legacy on the court

    Forty years ago, UVA’s basketball team rose to No. 1 for the first time, paving the way for the top-ranking teams of recent years.

  • Groovin’ on Grounds

    Groovin’ on Grounds

    When we asked alumni about their favorite college-year bands, the answers ran the gamut. Here’s a selection.

  • The rise and fall of a J-School at UVA

    The rise and fall of a J-School at UVA

    Amid the fervor of the Great War, UVA rid itself of a journalism school, and the pacifist it rode in on.

Spring 2021

Spring 2021

Too Clever by Halftime: the pep band’s 30 years of scrambling on the edge | Why ’81 Still Matters | UVA Had a J-School? | Chainsaw Zen

Table of Contents

More from Virginia Magazine

  • Game Show ’Hoos: Pressing their luck and testing their knowledge, clever Cavs take a spin on Wheel, Jeopardy!
  • A Higher Law: One McIntire professor’s lessons extend beyond the classroom
  • Born and Bread: Wahoo’s acclaimed NOLA restaurant has a slice of Charlottesville
  • Making Old Dorms New Again: The spaces that defined us first-year are getting redefined.

Highlights

Groovin’ on Grounds

Groovin’ on Grounds

When we asked alumni about their favorite college-year bands, the answers ran the gamut. Here’s a selection.
Pep Banned

Pep Banned

For 30 years, UVA’s scrambling Pep Band managed to stay one punchline ahead of the authorities.
A legacy on the court

A legacy on the court

Forty years ago, UVA’s basketball team rose to No. 1 for the first time, paving the way for the top-ranking teams of recent years.
Making the most of a COVID situation

Making the most of a COVID situation

In a hard year, some UVA notables found comfort and escape in books, music, movies and the woods. Here are the good things that have helped them through.

Video

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Making the Shots

Making the Shots

Go behind the scenes with longtime UVA sports photographer Matt Riley, from a day of fun studio shoots to an exciting men’s basketball game at JPJ.

Photo Gallery

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The camera sees what we can’t

The camera sees what we can’t

Charlottesville photographer Andrew Shurtleff in late March made these dramatic photographs of Grounds under quarantine using infrared technology, which captures wavelengths of light outside the spectrum of what the human eye can see. The result is a high-contrast image with a nearly dreamlike look.

Quotes

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Everybody is at the table, and everybody is working together.

Craig Kent, EVP for health affairs, on the collaboration to find a cure for Covid-19

Quirk - February 2021